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I hope many of you had the opportunity to join in with events and celebrations to mark the new Chinese Lunar Year, that of the Pig.  I have read that the associated attributes of the Year of the Pig include a beautiful personality, good fortune and special associations with the late evening and night time.  I see this as an excellent augury for City Health 2019 which has several presentations concerning the problems linked to alcohol and the night time economy, alongside sessions looking at the links between the environment and health, a look at the role of art, reflections on what we have learnt and community initiatives.  The presentation on Public health – heroes and villains is one I particularly look forward to. Almost certainly the best £75 you will spend during the Year of the Pig. http://cityhealthinternational.org/2019/

My celebrations didn’t extend further than eating an excess of rather fine food.  However, the obligatory fortune cookie contained a particularly apt pearl of wisdom, “I am not a genius, but I am a terrific package of experience”.  A reality which I am sure many of us can relate to, although, if you are a genius please do keep reading.  Over the last two decades working in the drugs and alcohol field I have had the good fortune to have worked with some outstanding individuals.  I have also been involved in helping develop and expand national programmes (this back when such things were well resourced), witnessed the expansion and use of evidence-based approaches and seen significant, real gains for communities and individuals.  Much of this has been built on new partnerships and alliances, and a willingness to think and work differently.

Of course, I have also had less positive experiences.  The last decade has seen increased financial challenges and political interest has proven fickle.   Under such pressure there is a tendency for individuals and agencies to dig in, concentrate on what is seen as core business, and so there is a natural inclination to maintain existing approaches. Afterall we all know that our own specific specialism or work area is THE most important, don’t we?

 Now there are always some who can see the benefit of forging new approaches and alliances to deal with the challenges our communities face.  Sometimes you have to run a scheme or project to find out if it works.  Its not unusual to find unexpected outcomes for example work to help improve care for those experiencing dementia can significantly reduce demands on police resources. Sometimes we learn most from things that don’t work. To understand and evaluate complex problems, develop new ideas and determine whether they are worthwhile across a range of indicators is complex and requires a range of expertise and experience. 

Unfortunately, it is easier said than done. A major barrier is the fact we all like clinging to our professional comfort blankets.  It is easier to remain within the secure territory composed of our own experience, stick with our peers and view things from well established, comfortable, positions.  This can feel safe, it certainly provides plenty of opportunity for mutual reaffirmation, but it limits vision and impact.

I recently hosted an event looking at the range of interventions in place across England that seek to reduce the number of intoxicated people who end up in our Accident and Emergency Departments at peak times.  This is an important area of research. There are a huge range of projects of this kind, with different structures, remits and levels of resourcing.  Up until now there has been little meaningful evaluation.  Now this is no simple task, with many variables but clearly there must be some approaches which are better or more cost effective than others. Some will have better impacts in terms of demand on ambulance services, local emergency department, demands on police time, public perception and protection of the vulnerable.  There are important considerations about the safety of those who may be heavily intoxicated or injured, the degree of clinical oversight required and of course whether we are making best use of scarce finances and valuable human resources.  It is a challenge but this research is a valuable step in helping improve understanding of what these type of initiatives can deliver and some of the key issues in providing a safe and effective service (some insights on this developing area, and other approaches to trying to reduce alcohol harm, will be provided at City Health 2019 in Liverpool next month).  But one thing I did notice when speaking to those present after the event that nearly everyone was considering these projects from their own professional perspective.  There was great insight and huge expertise, but it was narrow.  It didn’t reflect the needs and experience of Council Leaders, Town Centre managers, venue owners or indeed the public.

I was given the opportunity to reflect on these thoughts a few hours later when I had to take a relative to hospital.  As a busy Friday night in Accident and Emergency wore on, I saw a succession of individuals, whose path to hospital clearly involved alcohol, be assessed and then await being patched up.  Now the NHS provides, by and large, an excellent service, for those who are seriously injured or ill (the care my relative received was excellent).  However, once you have been assessed as not being very ill or seriously injured the wait for having wounds stitched or be generally patched up can be lengthy.  So lengthy in fact that visits by the Police to take statements were a welcome punctuation relieving the tedium of waiting.    I saw people wait over seven hours to be sutured, watching their hangovers kick in and their bruising develop. 

Now how do you cost and evaluate the benefit of not having an Emergency Department full of alcohol infused walking wounding? Not having seriously ill and sick people “enjoying” the company of the inebriated?  Reducing the workload of doctors and nurses? The benefits in not having to take police officers away from town centres to wander hospital corridors and departments seeking those who may have been victims or perpetrators?  This of course must be balanced against the clinical expertise to be found within an A&E unit and the fact they are key assets requiring significant resourcing.  Clearly not an easy equation, but I am certain its one we can’t answer in isolation.   The perspective of any single agency or professional can not deliver what is needed, only by engaging with all those with skin in the game can we determine what works best in any particular locality.  This applies to a whole host of health issues, not just alcohol.  So, in the Year of the Pig I think we should make an extra effort to broaden our work networks, consider broader outcomes and increase our terrific package of experience. Being in Liverpool on 22 March would be a grand start.

Monday, May 27, 2019
The value of partnership approaches and joint working to tackle major health public policy issues is widely accepted, if more rarely practised. Even where there is engagement with other professions or disciplines there is a tendency to work with those whose outlook is not too challenging and are closest to us in practice and approach. City Health has been at the forefront in challenging this and others are also working to weaken the silo walls. In the last two weeks I have been a spectator and a participant in two very different events which highlighted how important it is to include the end user, the public, our communities when developing and delivering services.
Wednesday, May 15, 2019
The confidence we have in our health systems is at the core of how we use and, hopefully benefit, from them. If we lack confidence in the benefits of going to see our GP for a health check, seeing a nurse about a travel vaccination or asking advice from the local pharmacist why would we bother? In terms of dealing with drug and alcohol problems the importance of a positive therapeutic relationship or alliance is recognised not just as being a pleasant “extra” but being central to aiding recovery. It has an important role across all fields of treatment. There are also benefits where a society has faith and confidence in those that oversee and provide healthcare systems and treatments at a population level. By and large, despite many complaints and challenges, the National Health Service in the UK remains a highly valued and trusted part of our society. And rightly so. But that doesn’t mean we should shy away from acknowledging where things have gone horribly wrong.
Tuesday, April 30, 2019
In England, the Easter public holidays see many of us get a four-day weekend. Schools are on holiday, roads are jammed, airports overflowing and much of the country indulges in chocolate, either in the form of eggs or bunnies. This year we also enjoyed some great weather. Fortunately, May looms, which brings another two holidays for us to recover from previous holiday excesses/hard work (delete as appropriate).
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Let me start with a big thank you to Liverpool, and especially the team from John Moores University, for another outstanding City Health conference. The impressive surroundings of Liverpool Medical Institute- a monument to the 19 th century’s commitment to science as well as its obsession with ancient Greece- proved to be an ideal venue. It contains a wonderful historic library, a selection of surgical and medical tools that bring a tear to the eye, and portraits of those who have contributed to the development of public health and modern health care, including some rather fearsome looking characters.

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.