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What an excellent event the City Health 2018 conference proved to be. The seventh edition since the inaugural event at the Guildhall in the City of London in 2012 each subsequent has added to the knowledge and breadth which makes this such a fascinating and unique undertaking. The city of Odesa were great hosts and combined with the tremendous efforts of the organisers nearly 250 participants from over 20 countries gathered to discuss how we can develop healthy responses during this period of unprecedented change and challenge.

It was a great pleasure to meet so many people committed to improving urban health and be exposed to so many examples of great work. There were also some incredibly stimulating and thoughtful presentations and inputs, not just from speakers but also members of the audience. While I can’t pretend the travelling (especially the rather tight transfer times) were anything other than tiring City Health has done a wonderful job of recharging my batteries and energising me to consider how I can make use of what I have learned in Odesa and apply it and share it with colleagues in London. It certainly reminded me that many colleagues around the world face a level of challenge in delivering evidence-based approaches that some of us struggle to imagine. Also, this blog will continue, not least because 2019 will see two City Health events!

The first of these will see City Health hosted by Liverpool John Moores University on 22 March. Liverpool is not just a city with an important maritime history or being famous as being the home of The Beatles, it also enjoys a long influential history of innovation around public health, having been the first city in England to appoint a Medical Officer of Health in the mid-19th century. More recently it has also been at the forefront of developments relating to harm reduction in relation to drug use and has led much of the work in trying to improve safety in the night time economy. Get the date in your calendar now. The other City Health event is to be held in Australia in September. While exact dates are yet to be confirmed this will be a great opportunity to take City Health beyond the confines of Europe and engage with a broader range of cities. Australia has, of course, often led global developments in terms of pragmatic and humane responses to problems associated with drug use. Though in terms of the current position relating to tobacco harm reduction it perhaps reminds us that no country has a monopoly on wisdom, or that previous victories mean there are not further battles to be fought in helping our most vulnerable communities. I very much hope you are able to participate or engage in one or other of these events.

Let me return to the recent conference in Odesa. The quality of speakers and presentations was outstanding. Reflecting the ethos of City Health, the presentations are already available via the website but in addition many were filmed, and these will be added in the coming weeks. Some of the issues which caught my attention will be flagged in forthcoming blogs, but I must mention David Wilson, the World Bank’s Global HIV/AIDS Program Director, who delivered the Alison Chesney and Eddie Kiloran Memorial lecture. He provided a global and historic overview of current health challenges, highlighting the great gains achieved by improved nutrition, sanitation, vaccination and antibiotics. He then raised the question that given this why are we so many societies and individuals experiencing such anxiety? He then highlighted examples where drug and alcohol use coupled with rises in heart disease were seeing declines in health expectancy. Looking to the future he outlined the challenges posed by the current technological revolution and suggested we all need to start looking at the current and future challenges in health rather than continuing to fight the battles of the past. That poses a considerable challenge for us all.

Thursday, April 11, 2019
Let me start with a big thank you to Liverpool, and especially the team from John Moores University, for another outstanding City Health conference. The impressive surroundings of Liverpool Medical Institute- a monument to the 19 th century’s commitment to science as well as its obsession with ancient Greece- proved to be an ideal venue. It contains a wonderful historic library, a selection of surgical and medical tools that bring a tear to the eye, and portraits of those who have contributed to the development of public health and modern health care, including some rather fearsome looking characters.
Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Welcome to my initial blog for City Health International. My intention over the coming months is to look at developments in research, politics and the media through the prism of urban health and what it may mean for the City Health community (so pretty much anyone reading this). While my background is in national and regional policy work around substance misuse, with a more recent interest in crime and anti-social behaviour issues, I will be looking at a much broader range of topics. Before we embark on that though I shall briefly explain how I got involved with the phenomenon that is City Health and how that helped extend my horizons beyond alcohol and drugs.
Sunday, January 27, 2019
I hope 2019 has begun well and that the year ahead proves a good one for you all. Despite the ongoing political uncertainty in the UK and increasing strain on budgets, with little hope of improvement in the near term, I remain surprisingly upbeat. It may be the result of what seems to have been a successful London Christmas alcohol campaign, once the data firms up I shall certainly share more. It could be the prospect of the forthcoming City Health International Conference in Liverpool on 22 March, which promises some great speakers. Possibly it is a result of small, but welcome, signs of a willingness to explore new ways of thinking and working to reduce health inequalities in relation to mental health and hepatitis. Perhaps it’s having just secured funding to update our Safer Nightlife guidance, which aims to reduce drug related harms in the night time economy. I am sure the money has helped, you could say it has incentivised me.
Monday, December 31, 2018
Like many I have spent the last two weeks demonstrating a casual disregard for the advice provided by health organisations in terms of food and alcohol consumption. My levels of physical activity have not been all they should have been either, although I am full of good intentions for the coming year and have started to make my overfed body walk more .

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.