City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

The main summer holiday season is coming to an end in London.  Traditionally, August is a quiet time where we catch up on long overdue administrative tasks and discuss potential collaborations for the coming months.   However, with City Health in Odesa less than two weeks away, I find myself in a reflective mood.   The last few months have seen a range of health stories in the media. Some got barely five minutes of interest, others generated coverage on television, and debate online.  What, I have been considering, are the actual impacts on our populations of this media interest?  People are exhorted to stop smoking, eat healthier, avoid sugar, drink less (if any) alcohol, be more active, avoid too much sun, and practice safe sex. No doubt there were also a few other topics that slipped passed me. How effective is this kind of advice?

Many years ago, I began work at the Department of Education.  At around the same time the government of the day introduced school league tables. They were soon joined by rankings of colleges and universities as well as comparisons of different age groups. There was always great political interest in these and no little controversy. The intention was to allow comparison, inform the potential customer, and to encourage competition. They were deeply unpopular with most education professionals. In many ways they failed to highlight those institutions or individuals making the most impressive contributions, and encouraged all kinds of gamesmanship. These tables are still produced on an annual basis, attract considerable media interest, where all the associated pros and cons are revisited and debated.

Hello again to the City Health community after my few weeks away. I hope some of you have also had the opportunity to enjoy a holiday. My batteries are recharged, and I am looking forward to the City Health conference in a month’s time. If you haven’t yet, have a look at the programme, I am sure you will find topics of interest. There really isn’t another event like City Health in terms of opportunities to learn from other cities and across professional disciplines. This all helps to provide a fertile environment to reflect upon individual areas of interest and activity.

Around the world, cities are increasingly concerned with not only protecting, but also improving the health of their citizens. This is driven by many factors, the link between a healthy population and economic success being one of the most politically compelling. Closely linked to this, health inequalities/inequities are recognised as barriers to cities achieving their potential. This concept has gained traction with a broad range of politicians and policy makers, even if the breadth of factors and levers to achieve these goals are perhaps less well understood. What is clear is that the delivery of a healthy city requires the involvement of agencies beyond the traditional, narrow, understanding of those which deliver medical services. We all regularly hear and chant the mantra of needing to end silo working and the virtue of adopting holistic approaches. 

Thursday, April 11, 2019
Let me start with a big thank you to Liverpool, and especially the team from John Moores University, for another outstanding City Health conference. The impressive surroundings of Liverpool Medical Institute- a monument to the 19 th century’s commitment to science as well as its obsession with ancient Greece- proved to be an ideal venue. It contains a wonderful historic library, a selection of surgical and medical tools that bring a tear to the eye, and portraits of those who have contributed to the development of public health and modern health care, including some rather fearsome looking characters.
Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Welcome to my initial blog for City Health International. My intention over the coming months is to look at developments in research, politics and the media through the prism of urban health and what it may mean for the City Health community (so pretty much anyone reading this). While my background is in national and regional policy work around substance misuse, with a more recent interest in crime and anti-social behaviour issues, I will be looking at a much broader range of topics. Before we embark on that though I shall briefly explain how I got involved with the phenomenon that is City Health and how that helped extend my horizons beyond alcohol and drugs.
Sunday, January 27, 2019
I hope 2019 has begun well and that the year ahead proves a good one for you all. Despite the ongoing political uncertainty in the UK and increasing strain on budgets, with little hope of improvement in the near term, I remain surprisingly upbeat. It may be the result of what seems to have been a successful London Christmas alcohol campaign, once the data firms up I shall certainly share more. It could be the prospect of the forthcoming City Health International Conference in Liverpool on 22 March, which promises some great speakers. Possibly it is a result of small, but welcome, signs of a willingness to explore new ways of thinking and working to reduce health inequalities in relation to mental health and hepatitis. Perhaps it’s having just secured funding to update our Safer Nightlife guidance, which aims to reduce drug related harms in the night time economy. I am sure the money has helped, you could say it has incentivised me.
Monday, December 31, 2018
Like many I have spent the last two weeks demonstrating a casual disregard for the advice provided by health organisations in terms of food and alcohol consumption. My levels of physical activity have not been all they should have been either, although I am full of good intentions for the coming year and have started to make my overfed body walk more .

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.