City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

Ignorance is a lot like alcohol: the more you have of it, the less you are able to see its effect on you – Jay Bylsma

It’s been a very busy few weeks.   I have been involved in finalising and rolling out a London wide alcohol campaign aimed at those out celebrating in the run up to Christmas.   Let me thank all who have contributed, especially my colleague Jess.  It’s been a serious piece of work getting partners on board and materials out on time.  No mean feat. You can find out more about Eat, Pace, Plan here https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/services/community-and-living/safer-city-partnership/Documents/christmas-toolkit-2018.pdf

On 3 December we hosted a major conference looking at how we can move to eradicate Hepatitis C.  It was a great event that attracted over 200 attendees, a positive indication of the growing interest in this issue.  It was also the biggest audience for one of our events since the first City Health Conference back in 2012.

We all have our heroes, those who inspire and motivate us. They may be historic or contemporary, known through books, film or via the news. Quite possibly we may have actually met or even worked alongside someone who we view as a hero. Many of us, if we think about it, will have a considerable number of heroes, and every country, city and profession provides its own candidates, though many are disputed and once established heroes can find themselves out of favour as views and understanding changes. Many of course never receive much in the way of acknowledgement or reward, quiet heroes going about their work without fanfare. Of course, the field of health improvement provides us with a rich list of famous names to choose from, Hippocrates, Jenner, Pasteur, Fleming, Snow (who I will return to), Bazalgette, Bevan. I am sure you could all add many, many more. This list is of course historic, and I want to ponder a moment on who might be celebrated as a hero in 20, 50 or 100 years.

Like another 1.5 million Londoners my commute to and from work regularly involves reading the Evening Standard, a free newspaper that enjoys a rich heritage and is almost a part of the fabric of the City. This despite its politics and editorial stance often being at odds with London’s inclinations. It does benefit from some quality journalism and has a breadth of coverage which reflects London’s status as a world city. Last Monday there were three articles which ensured I didn’t doze off on my journey, and which captured three of the key issues facing our major global centres.

A confession. As much as I would hate to be without my iPad or laptop and can barely remember how we got by before the internet opened access to a mind-boggling range of material I still like to read and hoard hard copies of important documents. Over two decades I have built a significant collection of reports, strategies and reviews. I couldn’t call it a library (it lacks much in terms of organisation) but it’s a resource where I can find a great deal of what was happening around drug policies and allied fields during the 1990’s and into the 21st century. In terms of external validation, I have had many individuals and agencies come to me for assistance, including central government, who had somehow lost copies of their own policy documents while switching to digital formats.

Monday, July 29, 2019
I write this on a day when London is experiencing, what is for us, exceptional temperatures. Overhead power lines and train tracks have warped. On some routes passengers have been advised to avoid travelling if possible, and many employers have encouraged staff to work from home. I suspect many who did travel to their workplaces were drawn by the prospect of effective air conditioning as much as personal work ethic. This great City was unusually quiet, apart from the pubs and bars who were doing a roaring trade. Who would begrudge people a pint of beer or a glass of wine when it’s so damn warm, especially when by delaying travelling an hour or two, the journey home may be made a little more tolerable?
Tuesday, July 16, 2019
Last week I met with someone who, having just completed a Masters in Epidemiology, is keen to work in the health field. Over a hot chocolate I outlined my perception of the current big issues relating to substance misuse, our most vulnerable populations and the policies and structures we have in place to address these issues.
Tuesday, July 02, 2019
Absolutely outstanding. That’s my carefully considered assessment of the Global Forum on Nicotine in Warsaw that I was fortunate enough to attend two weeks back. I say this despite the mosquito bites and the fact that the weather was rather warm for me. The event was one of those that provide a buzz and an energy that comes back to the workplace with you. This was fuelled by an outstanding array of speakers and a vibrant audience mix. Discussion and argument were not limited to the auditorium or breakout rooms, but instead could be heard throughout the venue, over lunch, during coffee breaks. There were attendees from every continent (well, ok, I didn’t actually meet anyone from Antarctica). Academics, clinicians, researchers, harm reduction advocates, retailers, product developers, policymakers, and- most importantly - vapers and users of other tobacco harm reduction products, all mixed together sharing views, experiences, and- as we should expect- differences of opinion. It certainly lived up to the conference strapline Its Time to Talk About Nicotine and the rich promise of a genuinely horizontal approach.
Monday, May 27, 2019
The value of partnership approaches and joint working to tackle major health public policy issues is widely accepted, if more rarely practised. Even where there is engagement with other professions or disciplines there is a tendency to work with those whose outlook is not too challenging and are closest to us in practice and approach. City Health has been at the forefront in challenging this and others are also working to weaken the silo walls. In the last two weeks I have been a spectator and a participant in two very different events which highlighted how important it is to include the end user, the public, our communities when developing and delivering services.

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.