City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

I was recently involved in a visit to London by a group from Washington DC. They were drawn from the offices of both Republican and Democrat members, and all shared an interest in learning more about UK harm reduction approaches. While my contribution was limited to illegal drugs and alcohol, they also met those involved in promoting tobacco harm reduction approaches. I am always struck by how much more difficult and complex we make harm reduction around legal substances than illegal. Providing advice on how an injecting heroin user might reduce risks to themselves and those around them is, by and large, pretty uncontroversial. Start talking about offering practical advice to those who drink above the government recommended guidelines or to those who smoke or otherwise consume nicotine (despite the efforts of Public Health England), and you can quickly find yourself in hot water.

Across the world many cities face high levels of criminal violence and murder. A quick search will reveal that in terms of global league tables, certain regions dominate with Latin America, North America and Sub Saharan Africa providing the top 50 violent cities. However, a cursory glance tells us this is a complicated picture with huge variations between and within countries. Complex factors are at play, differing social, economic and legislative environments all have an influence. A brief historical perspective tells us that improvements can be made, that nations and cities can act successfully to reduce the levels of violence experienced by their citizens.

Health sells, not just in terms of medical care or pharmaceuticals. News about health issues is a central staple of the mainstream media, all major newspapers and tv news programmes boast a health editor and provide their customers with a regular diet of stories about the latest cures, scares and developments relating to our wellbeing. The public have a great appetite for the topic, not a surprise given that all of us have a profound interest in health. Given the nature of the media they often have a particular angle. Some outlets can be relied upon to criticise almost any new government initiative as a shocking example of the “nanny state” preventing citizens going about their lives. Others tend to the opposing position that without the strong and vigilant guidance of the state citizens are all prone to making chronically bad choices with negative consequences not just for ourselves but those around us. This is often presented as being necessary not so much for the readers or viewers of the outlet in question, who are normally assumed by the writer to be wiser than the average, but for the benefit of lesser mortals.   To be fair we all tend to think it’s someone else who needs to change their ways rather than ourselves. The media also love a controversy, it could be about the merits of substitute prescribing for opiates, whether people should pay to see a medic, the rights and wrongs of vaccination programmes, all these and more make great copy.

Nearly all cities struggle with providing good quality and affordable homes for all their citizens. In some it’s become an existential challenge, fundamentally linked to the ability to continue to succeed or even survive. Our cities often have pockets of incredibly luxurious and expensive housing, beyond the reach of even those working in relatively well paid and secure jobs. It is sadly all to frequent that you can observe fellow citizens living in doorways, parks and underpasses in close proximity to these homes for the wealthy. In all measures other than geography they live lives very distant from the urban idyll. The issue of people ending up sleeping on the streets of our cities is to be found world-wide, from Osaka to Sao Paulo, from Auckland to Stockholm. The underlying reasons that lead people to living on the streets are often multi-faceted and can be linked to particular local or regional factors. Health issues, both physical and mental are more common than in the general population. Research from the UK indicates the significant role played by alcohol and drugs. There is a strong correlation in terms of individuals who have experienced some form of significant trauma. We also cannot ignore the impact of national and municipal policies. Across the globe, policies intended to reduce government expenditure have made many millions more vulnerable to becoming homeless. 

Thursday, April 11, 2019
Let me start with a big thank you to Liverpool, and especially the team from John Moores University, for another outstanding City Health conference. The impressive surroundings of Liverpool Medical Institute- a monument to the 19 th century’s commitment to science as well as its obsession with ancient Greece- proved to be an ideal venue. It contains a wonderful historic library, a selection of surgical and medical tools that bring a tear to the eye, and portraits of those who have contributed to the development of public health and modern health care, including some rather fearsome looking characters.
Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Welcome to my initial blog for City Health International. My intention over the coming months is to look at developments in research, politics and the media through the prism of urban health and what it may mean for the City Health community (so pretty much anyone reading this). While my background is in national and regional policy work around substance misuse, with a more recent interest in crime and anti-social behaviour issues, I will be looking at a much broader range of topics. Before we embark on that though I shall briefly explain how I got involved with the phenomenon that is City Health and how that helped extend my horizons beyond alcohol and drugs.
Sunday, January 27, 2019
I hope 2019 has begun well and that the year ahead proves a good one for you all. Despite the ongoing political uncertainty in the UK and increasing strain on budgets, with little hope of improvement in the near term, I remain surprisingly upbeat. It may be the result of what seems to have been a successful London Christmas alcohol campaign, once the data firms up I shall certainly share more. It could be the prospect of the forthcoming City Health International Conference in Liverpool on 22 March, which promises some great speakers. Possibly it is a result of small, but welcome, signs of a willingness to explore new ways of thinking and working to reduce health inequalities in relation to mental health and hepatitis. Perhaps it’s having just secured funding to update our Safer Nightlife guidance, which aims to reduce drug related harms in the night time economy. I am sure the money has helped, you could say it has incentivised me.
Monday, December 31, 2018
Like many I have spent the last two weeks demonstrating a casual disregard for the advice provided by health organisations in terms of food and alcohol consumption. My levels of physical activity have not been all they should have been either, although I am full of good intentions for the coming year and have started to make my overfed body walk more .

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.