City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

Around the world, cities are increasingly concerned with not only protecting, but also improving the health of their citizens. This is driven by many factors, the link between a healthy population and economic success being one of the most politically compelling. Closely linked to this, health inequalities/inequities are recognised as barriers to cities achieving their potential. This concept has gained traction with a broad range of politicians and policy makers, even if the breadth of factors and levers to achieve these goals are perhaps less well understood. What is clear is that the delivery of a healthy city requires the involvement of agencies beyond the traditional, narrow, understanding of those which deliver medical services. We all regularly hear and chant the mantra of needing to end silo working and the virtue of adopting holistic approaches. 

In 1960 one third of the global population was to be found living in urban settings. Now, more than half the population lives in cities and this trend is accelerating. The future is increasingly urban. Of course, cities are frequently viewed as a being a source of problems, be that as crime generators, dens of sin, blighted by pollution or scenes of great poverty. From the tale of Babel onwards we seem to be programmed to focus on the “big city” as being at odds with the peace, calm and implied health of the rural idyll. 

Around the world many are working on how we develop support for ageing populations. In South Korea they are looking to restructure jobs to make them more suitable for older workers. Brazil has established older people’s councils to consider the issues and generate ideas. The World Health Organisation has identified ten priorities towards making 2020-2030 a decade of health ageing. One of these priorities is sharing information and experience.

We all make mistakes. These will be of varying degrees and seriousness, but all of us can look back on judgements that proved to be wrong, decisions made in error or things we would, in hindsight, have done differently. Sometimes it may be that we just didn’t understand the impact of a particular factor or event. The same also applies to organisations. Neither good intentions nor past success provides immunity. Of course, the larger and more influential an organisation, the more the consequences of mistakes are likely to be magnified. Businesses may pay for these mistakes in terms of profit, share value or even their survival. We may want to ponder the consequences when health bodies make significant errors.

Monday, September 23, 2019
Sometimes things just work out. Last Monday, I was involved in three separate events which each highlighted the potential of urban areas to effectively tackle health issues when there is political leadership to do so. The day also provided a timely reminder of the importance of harm reduction, and how this needs to be at the heart of health approaches in our cities. With so many countries and agencies forgetting the lessons of harm reduction, or actively turning their back on them for narrow ideological reasons, it was uplifting to hear examples which delivered quantifiable gains in terms of lives, better health, and human rights.
Monday, September 09, 2019
With City Health 2019 in Melbourne now only weeks away, a headline in the papers caught my eye. According to the annual Global Liveability Index- whose criteria include stability, healthcare, culture, education, environment, and infrastructure- the Austrian capital Vienna narrowly beats Melbourne to the top spot. Of course, such rankings are open to debate and dependent on what you choose to measure but it’s fair to say the occupants of city halls take a degree of pride in seeing “their” cities topping the charts.
Monday, September 02, 2019
This is not the blog I was planning to write. My intention was to look at developments in managing the Night Time Economy across a number of cities, an area where there is innovation and positive developments. Instead I feel compelled to look at an issue where the UK and others are demonstrably going backwards. Battles we thought had been won in fact appear lost, progress has not just stalled but been significantly reversed. It poses hard questions for many organisations and for individuals, including myself. So, come with me as I look at drug related deaths.
Monday, July 29, 2019
I write this on a day when London is experiencing, what is for us, exceptional temperatures. Overhead power lines and train tracks have warped. On some routes passengers have been advised to avoid travelling if possible, and many employers have encouraged staff to work from home. I suspect many who did travel to their workplaces were drawn by the prospect of effective air conditioning as much as personal work ethic. This great City was unusually quiet, apart from the pubs and bars who were doing a roaring trade. Who would begrudge people a pint of beer or a glass of wine when it’s so damn warm, especially when by delaying travelling an hour or two, the journey home may be made a little more tolerable?

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.