City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

We all make mistakes. These will be of varying degrees and seriousness, but all of us can look back on judgements that proved to be wrong, decisions made in error or things we would, in hindsight, have done differently. Sometimes it may be that we just didn’t understand the impact of a particular factor or event. The same also applies to organisations. Neither good intentions nor past success provides immunity. Of course, the larger and more influential an organisation, the more the consequences of mistakes are likely to be magnified. Businesses may pay for these mistakes in terms of profit, share value or even their survival. We may want to ponder the consequences when health bodies make significant errors.

We all know there are many factors involved in any individual’s health, there are environmental factors, the physical circumstances in which they live, their behaviours and genetics. Access to good medical services, for both prevention and treatment are also recognised as being important. But the processes by which it is decided which services are provided where, be that at a national, regional or local level are, perhaps, less frequently considered. Yet we all know there are significant variations in everything from cancer survival rates (good to be in the USA, Canada, Australia, Finland or Iceland) to access to good quality ante-natal and early years care, where Western Europe general does well as do Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong and Macau but the USA does relatively badly.

I was recently involved in a visit to London by a group from Washington DC. They were drawn from the offices of both Republican and Democrat members, and all shared an interest in learning more about UK harm reduction approaches. While my contribution was limited to illegal drugs and alcohol, they also met those involved in promoting tobacco harm reduction approaches. I am always struck by how much more difficult and complex we make harm reduction around legal substances than illegal. Providing advice on how an injecting heroin user might reduce risks to themselves and those around them is, by and large, pretty uncontroversial. Start talking about offering practical advice to those who drink above the government recommended guidelines or to those who smoke or otherwise consume nicotine (despite the efforts of Public Health England), and you can quickly find yourself in hot water.

Across the world many cities face high levels of criminal violence and murder. A quick search will reveal that in terms of global league tables, certain regions dominate with Latin America, North America and Sub Saharan Africa providing the top 50 violent cities. However, a cursory glance tells us this is a complicated picture with huge variations between and within countries. Complex factors are at play, differing social, economic and legislative environments all have an influence. A brief historical perspective tells us that improvements can be made, that nations and cities can act successfully to reduce the levels of violence experienced by their citizens.

Wednesday, October 30, 2019
When I hosted the first City Health conference in 2012, my hope was we might manage three or four events in different cities. I never dreamt we’d get to nine (and counting) or that City Health would reach the great city of Melbourne. Great credit must go to the Progressive Public Health Alliance for hosting a fascinating two days that provided energy, enthusiasm and challenge. Personally, I learnt a great deal and found myself questioning somehow of my own views. I met people doing amazing things in the most challenging environments. I heard of situations that made me feel a sense of despair but came away reassured that we have the knowledge, networks and commitment to positively change lives for the better.
Monday, September 23, 2019
Sometimes things just work out. Last Monday, I was involved in three separate events which each highlighted the potential of urban areas to effectively tackle health issues when there is political leadership to do so. The day also provided a timely reminder of the importance of harm reduction, and how this needs to be at the heart of health approaches in our cities. With so many countries and agencies forgetting the lessons of harm reduction, or actively turning their back on them for narrow ideological reasons, it was uplifting to hear examples which delivered quantifiable gains in terms of lives, better health, and human rights.
Monday, September 09, 2019
With City Health 2019 in Melbourne now only weeks away, a headline in the papers caught my eye. According to the annual Global Liveability Index- whose criteria include stability, healthcare, culture, education, environment, and infrastructure- the Austrian capital Vienna narrowly beats Melbourne to the top spot. Of course, such rankings are open to debate and dependent on what you choose to measure but it’s fair to say the occupants of city halls take a degree of pride in seeing “their” cities topping the charts.
Monday, September 02, 2019
This is not the blog I was planning to write. My intention was to look at developments in managing the Night Time Economy across a number of cities, an area where there is innovation and positive developments. Instead I feel compelled to look at an issue where the UK and others are demonstrably going backwards. Battles we thought had been won in fact appear lost, progress has not just stalled but been significantly reversed. It poses hard questions for many organisations and for individuals, including myself. So, come with me as I look at drug related deaths.

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.