City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

I was recently involved in a visit to London by a group from Washington DC. They were drawn from the offices of both Republican and Democrat members, and all shared an interest in learning more about UK harm reduction approaches. While my contribution was limited to illegal drugs and alcohol, they also met those involved in promoting tobacco harm reduction approaches. I am always struck by how much more difficult and complex we make harm reduction around legal substances than illegal. Providing advice on how an injecting heroin user might reduce risks to themselves and those around them is, by and large, pretty uncontroversial. Start talking about offering practical advice to those who drink above the government recommended guidelines or to those who smoke or otherwise consume nicotine (despite the efforts of Public Health England), and you can quickly find yourself in hot water.

Across the world many cities face high levels of criminal violence and murder. A quick search will reveal that in terms of global league tables, certain regions dominate with Latin America, North America and Sub Saharan Africa providing the top 50 violent cities. However, a cursory glance tells us this is a complicated picture with huge variations between and within countries. Complex factors are at play, differing social, economic and legislative environments all have an influence. A brief historical perspective tells us that improvements can be made, that nations and cities can act successfully to reduce the levels of violence experienced by their citizens.

Health sells, not just in terms of medical care or pharmaceuticals. News about health issues is a central staple of the mainstream media, all major newspapers and tv news programmes boast a health editor and provide their customers with a regular diet of stories about the latest cures, scares and developments relating to our wellbeing. The public have a great appetite for the topic, not a surprise given that all of us have a profound interest in health. Given the nature of the media they often have a particular angle. Some outlets can be relied upon to criticise almost any new government initiative as a shocking example of the “nanny state” preventing citizens going about their lives. Others tend to the opposing position that without the strong and vigilant guidance of the state citizens are all prone to making chronically bad choices with negative consequences not just for ourselves but those around us. This is often presented as being necessary not so much for the readers or viewers of the outlet in question, who are normally assumed by the writer to be wiser than the average, but for the benefit of lesser mortals.   To be fair we all tend to think it’s someone else who needs to change their ways rather than ourselves. The media also love a controversy, it could be about the merits of substitute prescribing for opiates, whether people should pay to see a medic, the rights and wrongs of vaccination programmes, all these and more make great copy.

Nearly all cities struggle with providing good quality and affordable homes for all their citizens. In some it’s become an existential challenge, fundamentally linked to the ability to continue to succeed or even survive. Our cities often have pockets of incredibly luxurious and expensive housing, beyond the reach of even those working in relatively well paid and secure jobs. It is sadly all to frequent that you can observe fellow citizens living in doorways, parks and underpasses in close proximity to these homes for the wealthy. In all measures other than geography they live lives very distant from the urban idyll. The issue of people ending up sleeping on the streets of our cities is to be found world-wide, from Osaka to Sao Paulo, from Auckland to Stockholm. The underlying reasons that lead people to living on the streets are often multi-faceted and can be linked to particular local or regional factors. Health issues, both physical and mental are more common than in the general population. Research from the UK indicates the significant role played by alcohol and drugs. There is a strong correlation in terms of individuals who have experienced some form of significant trauma. We also cannot ignore the impact of national and municipal policies. Across the globe, policies intended to reduce government expenditure have made many millions more vulnerable to becoming homeless. 

Wednesday, January 15, 2020
So here we are: 2020. Let me start by wishing all of you the very best for the year ahead. I have, occasionally, been accused of an inclination toward cynicism and a failure to look on the bright side of things. So, for my first blog of the year, at least, I am going to be determinedly upbeat. You can judge for yourself how long it lasts. This sense of optimism is influenced by the fact that the end of 2019 saw some positive signs in the world of substance misuse. While it was something of a mad scramble against time, we managed to pull together a high quality and well-supported pan-London Christmas alcohol campaign. I am very grateful to colleagues who delivered the key elements of this work and to everyone who supported it. Some, in fact, went well beyond the call of duty to engage with our colleagues in the blue light services. Although we will not have any data in terms of its reach and impact for some months (I will update you), what I can confidently say is that many individuals and organisations liked the messaging and tone. I like to think it is helping contribute to Londoners having a more considered and healthier relationship with alcohol, though there is a way to go yet!
Wednesday, December 18, 2019
It has been a little while since I managed to produce a blog. Workwise things have been especially hectic as we end the year. Not least in helping get another London Christmas alcohol campaign organised. You can see the resource produced here . Early next year I will share our experience of this year’s campaign. Looking back 2019 has been a year when the headlines relating to drugs have been consistently negative. Record drug related deaths, some worrying prevalence data, growing concerns around crime and financial pressure on service delivery. On the positive side there is some sense that drug issues are getting back on to the agenda. Hopefully this will continue. A personal highlight of 2019 was getting to hear and speak with so many fascinating people at City Health Melbourne.
Wednesday, October 30, 2019
When I hosted the first City Health conference in 2012, my hope was we might manage three or four events in different cities. I never dreamt we’d get to nine (and counting) or that City Health would reach the great city of Melbourne. Great credit must go to the Progressive Public Health Alliance for hosting a fascinating two days that provided energy, enthusiasm and challenge. Personally, I learnt a great deal and found myself questioning somehow of my own views. I met people doing amazing things in the most challenging environments. I heard of situations that made me feel a sense of despair but came away reassured that we have the knowledge, networks and commitment to positively change lives for the better.
Monday, September 23, 2019
Sometimes things just work out. Last Monday, I was involved in three separate events which each highlighted the potential of urban areas to effectively tackle health issues when there is political leadership to do so. The day also provided a timely reminder of the importance of harm reduction, and how this needs to be at the heart of health approaches in our cities. With so many countries and agencies forgetting the lessons of harm reduction, or actively turning their back on them for narrow ideological reasons, it was uplifting to hear examples which delivered quantifiable gains in terms of lives, better health, and human rights.

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.