City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

What colour would you use to describe the great advances in population health of the last hundred years? Perhaps something bright and cheery? A nice vibrant yellow, or perhaps a warm orange? As appropriate as these might seem I would argue the colour grey possesses a strong case. My reasoning? The massive increase in life expectancy we have witnessed and so the associated increase in grey heads to be seen amongst our populations.

In the 1900’s life expectancy in England and Wales was 46 for men and 50 for women. A century later these had increased to 77 and 81 respectively. Spectacular improvements by any standard. Not all countries have shared the benefits equally, progress is not even across countries or socio-economic groups. It is worth reminding ourselves that Africa saw a fall in life expectancy during the 1990’s due to the AIDS epidemic, which was only reversed when effective responses (political, social and medical) were deployed. Eastern Europe also suffered a drop-in life expectancy in the period of turmoil following the end of the Soviet era. These both serve as reminders that there is nothing inevitable about progress and improvement.

The fact that cities and urban centres can increase stress in individuals is well recognised.  There is a correlation between living in a city and a range of mental health problems, although this doesn’t automatically mean urban life has to have a negative impact on our wellbeing.  Cities concentrate on a range of factors, both positive and negative. So, a city may suffer from pockets of deprivation, high rates of crime and pollution, but also provide good educational opportunities, access to modern medical care and stimulating public spaces.  However, as anyone who commutes through a big city will know there is a lot of stress about.

Хорошо известно, что города и городские центры могут усилить стресс у отдельных лиц. Существует корреляция между проживанием в городе и рядом проблем, связанных с психическим здоровьем, хотя это автоматически не означает, что городская жизнь должна оказывать негативное влияние на наше благополучие. С городом связанны ряд факторов, как положительных, так и отрицательных. Таким образом, жизнь в городе может быть связанной с лишениями, высокими показателями преступности и загрязнения, но она также обеспечивает хорошие возможности для получения образования, доступ к современной медицинской помощи и развитию общественных пространств. Однако, каждый, кто совершает поездку через большой город, знает, она вызывает много стресса.

Я не хочу наступать на пятки своим друзьям и коллегам, ведущим блог по науке и политике Никотина, но, поскольку 14 марта был Национальный День отказа от курения, немного поразмышляю о курении в Великобритании. Это было в 1984 году, сразу после того, как я начал свою первую работу, и я, признаюсь, курил. 34 года - это не о потраченных деньгах, поврежденной одежде, случайных ожогах (курение в шлеме безопасности - это не то, что я сделал бы снова), или другие риски, связанные с курением табака. Нет, это о факте, что мир тогда был совсем другим.

Thursday, April 11, 2019
Let me start with a big thank you to Liverpool, and especially the team from John Moores University, for another outstanding City Health conference. The impressive surroundings of Liverpool Medical Institute- a monument to the 19 th century’s commitment to science as well as its obsession with ancient Greece- proved to be an ideal venue. It contains a wonderful historic library, a selection of surgical and medical tools that bring a tear to the eye, and portraits of those who have contributed to the development of public health and modern health care, including some rather fearsome looking characters.
Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Welcome to my initial blog for City Health International. My intention over the coming months is to look at developments in research, politics and the media through the prism of urban health and what it may mean for the City Health community (so pretty much anyone reading this). While my background is in national and regional policy work around substance misuse, with a more recent interest in crime and anti-social behaviour issues, I will be looking at a much broader range of topics. Before we embark on that though I shall briefly explain how I got involved with the phenomenon that is City Health and how that helped extend my horizons beyond alcohol and drugs.
Sunday, January 27, 2019
I hope 2019 has begun well and that the year ahead proves a good one for you all. Despite the ongoing political uncertainty in the UK and increasing strain on budgets, with little hope of improvement in the near term, I remain surprisingly upbeat. It may be the result of what seems to have been a successful London Christmas alcohol campaign, once the data firms up I shall certainly share more. It could be the prospect of the forthcoming City Health International Conference in Liverpool on 22 March, which promises some great speakers. Possibly it is a result of small, but welcome, signs of a willingness to explore new ways of thinking and working to reduce health inequalities in relation to mental health and hepatitis. Perhaps it’s having just secured funding to update our Safer Nightlife guidance, which aims to reduce drug related harms in the night time economy. I am sure the money has helped, you could say it has incentivised me.
Monday, December 31, 2018
Like many I have spent the last two weeks demonstrating a casual disregard for the advice provided by health organisations in terms of food and alcohol consumption. My levels of physical activity have not been all they should have been either, although I am full of good intentions for the coming year and have started to make my overfed body walk more .

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.