City Health International

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City Health International is delighted to announce we have established a blog on the website to promote debate and discussion around current issues of interest to the network. David MacKintosh, one of the founders of the network, writes a weekly piece, posted here. We also invite contributions to the blog from others with ideas and opinions on issues relating to health behaviours and urban health and well being and who wish to share with others. If you would like to contribute, please send your post to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will ensure it is posted on the site and placed in the weekly City Health alerts sent to those in the network.

I hope many of you had the opportunity to join in with events and celebrations to mark the new Chinese Lunar Year, that of the Pig.  I have read that the associated attributes of the Year of the Pig include a beautiful personality, good fortune and special associations with the late evening and night time.  I see this as an excellent augury for City Health 2019 which has several presentations concerning the problems linked to alcohol and the night time economy, alongside sessions looking at the links between the environment and health, a look at the role of art, reflections on what we have learnt and community initiatives.  The presentation on Public health – heroes and villains is one I particularly look forward to. Almost certainly the best £75 you will spend during the Year of the Pig. http://cityhealthinternational.org/2019/

I hope 2019 has begun well and that the year ahead proves a good one for you all.  Despite the ongoing political uncertainty in the UK and increasing strain on budgets, with little hope of improvement in the near term, I remain surprisingly upbeat.  It may be the result of what seems to have been a successful London Christmas alcohol campaign, once the data firms up I shall certainly share more.  It could be the prospect of the forthcoming City Health International Conference in Liverpool on 22 March, which promises some great speakers.  Possibly it is a result of small, but welcome, signs of a willingness to explore new ways of thinking and working to reduce health inequalities in relation to mental health and hepatitis. Perhaps it’s having just secured funding to update our Safer Nightlife guidance, which aims to reduce drug related harms in the night time economy. I am sure the money has helped, you could say it has incentivised me.

Like many I have spent the last two weeks demonstrating a casual disregard for the advice provided by health organisations in terms of food and alcohol consumption. My levels of physical activity have not been all they should have been either, although I am full of good intentions for the coming year and have started to make my overfed body walk more.

The year is ending at a gallop.  Brexit may have pretty much paralyzed the government in Westminster but in national, regional and local administrations the wheels still turn.  Health issues still feature in the media, some, such as rough sleeping and alcohol intoxication, being seasonal fixtures.  Universities and experts continue to provide new analysis, information and fresh angles on key subjects.  This may all sound very self-evident to colleagues outside the UK, but it is reassuring, at least to me, to take a moment and remind ourselves that the earth has not stopped turning on its axis as issues over the backstop, second referendum, votes of no confidence etc. etc. dominate the news and conversation.

Monday, July 29, 2019
I write this on a day when London is experiencing, what is for us, exceptional temperatures. Overhead power lines and train tracks have warped. On some routes passengers have been advised to avoid travelling if possible, and many employers have encouraged staff to work from home. I suspect many who did travel to their workplaces were drawn by the prospect of effective air conditioning as much as personal work ethic. This great City was unusually quiet, apart from the pubs and bars who were doing a roaring trade. Who would begrudge people a pint of beer or a glass of wine when it’s so damn warm, especially when by delaying travelling an hour or two, the journey home may be made a little more tolerable?
Tuesday, July 16, 2019
Last week I met with someone who, having just completed a Masters in Epidemiology, is keen to work in the health field. Over a hot chocolate I outlined my perception of the current big issues relating to substance misuse, our most vulnerable populations and the policies and structures we have in place to address these issues.
Tuesday, July 02, 2019
Absolutely outstanding. That’s my carefully considered assessment of the Global Forum on Nicotine in Warsaw that I was fortunate enough to attend two weeks back. I say this despite the mosquito bites and the fact that the weather was rather warm for me. The event was one of those that provide a buzz and an energy that comes back to the workplace with you. This was fuelled by an outstanding array of speakers and a vibrant audience mix. Discussion and argument were not limited to the auditorium or breakout rooms, but instead could be heard throughout the venue, over lunch, during coffee breaks. There were attendees from every continent (well, ok, I didn’t actually meet anyone from Antarctica). Academics, clinicians, researchers, harm reduction advocates, retailers, product developers, policymakers, and- most importantly - vapers and users of other tobacco harm reduction products, all mixed together sharing views, experiences, and- as we should expect- differences of opinion. It certainly lived up to the conference strapline Its Time to Talk About Nicotine and the rich promise of a genuinely horizontal approach.
Monday, May 27, 2019
The value of partnership approaches and joint working to tackle major health public policy issues is widely accepted, if more rarely practised. Even where there is engagement with other professions or disciplines there is a tendency to work with those whose outlook is not too challenging and are closest to us in practice and approach. City Health has been at the forefront in challenging this and others are also working to weaken the silo walls. In the last two weeks I have been a spectator and a participant in two very different events which highlighted how important it is to include the end user, the public, our communities when developing and delivering services.

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CITY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

CHI Melbourne 2019

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CHI Liverpool 2019

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CHI Odessa 2018

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CHI Basel 2017

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CHI London 2016

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CHI Barcelona 2015

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CHI Amsterdam 2014

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CHI Glasgow 2013

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CHI London 2012

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City Health International
Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.
For the first time in history the majority of the world’s population now live in urban environments and the proportion continues to grow. As national governments struggle to deal with the pressures and demands of growing urban populations against a backdrop of financial deficits and uncertainty, it is increasingly left to those working at a city level to provide the leadership and support needed to tackle key health issues.