Luc Van Daele

Luc Van Daele has been vaping since 2007, first as a dual user, but when products became more reliable he switched completely to vaping. Being already aware of the threats of over regulating he has been actively involved in convincing politicians and regulators since the first day he became a vaper. He also played an active part in improving on the first generation of e-cigarettes, sending his designs to Chinese manufacturers who took some of them in production.

Luc was formed as an architect and specialised as an engineer in building acoustics. He started his first company at the age of 25 and enjoyed an international career in Belgium, the UK and France. Now enjoying an early retirement in the south of France, he spends his time on vaping advocacy, designing new vaping products and playing golf.

Carlo Fabian

Carlo Fabian, Senior Researcher, Project Leader and Lecturer, University of Applied Sciences and Arts (FHNW), Switzerland
Carlo Fabian, PhD, is a Professor, Senior Researcher and Project Leader at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), Institute for Social Planning, Organisational Change and Urban Development. He has a degree in Health and Social Psychology, is a Specialist Psychologist in Health Psychology (FSP) and has a Master of Advanced studies (MAS) in Coaching Studies. After several years as researcher and lecturer at the University of Zurich (1997-2001), the Swiss Institute for Health and Addiction Research (1999-2000) and the FHNW (2001-2008), he worked at RADIX (2008-2012), a Swiss not-for-profit organisation, where he developed and implemented many projects in municipalities with a focus on participation.
Since 2011 he has led projects at the FHNW addressing the subject of urban development, participatory planning and well-being. Two current projects are “Urban development and health promotion – A field of action for social work” and “Nature-oriented, child and youth friendly neighbourhoods and settlement development”. More information: www.fhnw.ch/personen/carlo-fabian

David MacKintosh

David MacKintosh is currently the Head of Community Safety for the City of London, he has also been the Policy Adviser/Director to the London Drug and Alcohol Policy Forum (LDAPF) since 2001. The LDAPF works to support policy delivery and promote good practice across the drugs, alcohol and community safety agendas. It has been involved in running a number of innovative campaigns around issues including drug driving, substance misuse in the workplace and improving awareness around drug safety in clubs and pubs. The LDAPF is funded by the City of London as part of its commitment to improving the life of all those who live and work in London. For the last seven years he has also been seconded to the Greater London Authority to provide advice around substance use issues and health inequalities.

Prior to this post David worked for the United Kingdom Anti-Drug Co-ordination Unit (part of the Cabinet Office) for two years, primarily on young people and treatment policy issues. This followed on from some 8 years in the Department for Education and Skills where he worked in a number of areas including international relations and higher education policy. He is trustee of an East London based service provider and Adfam (families, drugs and alcohol).

Kevin Fenton

Public Health England National Director for Health and Wellbeing

In this role he oversees PHE's national prevention programmes including screening for cancer and other conditions, Health Checks, public mental health, sexual and reproductive health, and a range of wellbeing programmes for infants, youth, adults and older adults. The Health and Wellbeing Directorate also leads PHE's Health Equity portfolio with a range of programmes and activities focused on addressing the social determinants of health and promoting place-based approaches to health improvement.

Professor Fenton was previously the director of the National Centre for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a position he held for seven years from November 2005. He also served as chief of CDC’s National Syphilis Elimination Effort and has worked in research, epidemiology, and the prevention of HIV and other STDs since 1995. Previously he was the director of the HIV and STI Department at the United Kingdom’s Health Protection Agency.

He attended medical school in Jamaica, obtained his master's in public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and PhD in Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the University College London. He has authored or co-authored more than 250 peer-reviewed scientific articles and policy reports. 

In this role he oversees PHE's national prevention programmes including screening for cancer and other conditions, Health Checks, public mental health, sexual and reproductive health, and a range of wellbeing programmes for infants, youth, adults and older adults. The Health and Wellbeing Directorate also leads PHE's Health Equity portfolio with a range of programmes and activities focused on addressing the social determinants of health and promoting place-based approaches to health improvement.

Professor Fenton was previously the director of the National Centre for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a position he held for seven years from November 2005. He also served as chief of CDC’s National Syphilis Elimination Effort and has worked in research, epidemiology, and the prevention of HIV and other STDs since 1995. Previously he was the director of the HIV and STI Department at the United Kingdom’s Health Protection Agency.

He attended medical school in Jamaica, obtained his master's in public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and PhD in Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the University College London. He has authored or co-authored more than 250 peer-reviewed scientific articles and policy reports. 

Michel Kazatchkine

Professor Michel Kazatchkine is a French physician, diplomat and advocate, best known for his work in international AIDS treatment issues. A former Director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, in July 2012 UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon appointed him as his United Nations Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Michel is also a Senior Fellow with the Global Health Programme of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, a member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy and serves as Chair of the Board of the Robert Carr Civil Society Networks Fund. Following graduation from medical school in Paris, he then studied immunology at the Pasteur Institute. He first treated AIDS patients in 1983, and by 1985 had founded a clinic in Paris specializing in AIDS treatment and directed the French National Agency for AIDS Research between 1998-2005. He is a member of Médecins du Monde and one of the founders of Nova Dona, which is a non-profit organization giving services to drug users in Paris.

From 2004-2007 Michel also served as a Chair of the World Health Organisation's Strategic and Technical Advisory Committee on HIV/AIDS and as a member of the WHO's Scientific and Technical Advisory Group on tuberculosis. In February 2005 he became France's HIV/AIDS and communicable diseases global ambassador and served in this role until 2007.

Ingrid van Beek

Ingrid van Beek is a public health and addiction medicine physician who has been the Director of the Kirketon Road Centre (KRC), in Sydney’s Kings Cross for the past 25 years. KRC’s integrated primary health care service is recognised as a best practice model in the prevention, treatment and care of transmissible infections among vulnerable populations in urban settings.  Ingrid was also the founding Medical Director of Australia’s first Medically Supervised Injecting Centre from 2000 until 2008. Her work at the sharp end of harm reduction was recognised in 2010 when she was awarded Membership of the Order of Australia (AM).

Harry Burns

Sir Harry Burns is the Professor of Global Public Health, at the University of Strathclyde, having been the Chief Medical Officer for Scotland from 2005 to 2014. He has become known for his work to address health inequalities. He is a member of the Council of Economic Advisers in Scotland.

Born in Barrhead, East Renfrewshire he graduated in medicine from the University of Glasgow and initially pursued a career in general surgery. For five years he was a consultant surgeon at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, later becoming the Medical Director of the hospital.

Harry completed a master's degree in Public Health in 1990, going on to work as Medical Director of Glasgow Royal Infirmary, before becoming the Director of Public Health for Greater Glasgow in 1995. In 1999 he was awarded a visiting professorship in public health medicine at the University of Glasgow, and he also became a senior research fellow in the School of Business and Management at the university. Harry took up the post of Chief Medical Officer for Scotland in September 2005 and began to help Scotland conceptualise health improvement differently, being aware that the small gains that resulted from a range of interventions can add up to produce significant overall improvements.

Harry stepped down as CMO in April 2014 to take up the appointment of Professor of Global Public Health at University of Strathclyde University. He was knighted in the 2011 the Birthday Honours in recognition of outstanding achievement and service to society and, In December 2014, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon presented him with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the first Scottish Public Service Awards, recognising his lasting contributions to public service in Scotland.

Konstantinos Farsalinos

Dr Konstantinos Farsalinos is a cardiologist, working as researcher at Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center in Athens-Greece and at Medical Imaging Research Center, University Hospital Gathuisberg in Leuven-Belgium. His main research interests are new modalities in cardiovascular imaging and he has received a scholarship from the Greek Society of Cardiology for research and education in this field. He has studied the effects of smoking on subclinical cardiac dysfunction using new imaging techniques since 2010.

He has been actively performing research on electronic cigarettes since 2011 as a principle investigator, in both clinical and laboratory level. Examples of his work include the first study on the cytotoxic effects of electronic cigarette vapor on cultured cells and the immediate effects of electronic cigarettes used on cardiac function and coronary circulation. He has presented his research in major international scientific congresses and has published more than 15 studies and letters about e-cigarettes in peer-reviewed medical journals.

Geoff Gallop

Emeritus Professor Geoff Gallop AC. Dr Gallop completed degrees at the University of Western Australia (BEc), Murdoch University (MPhil) and as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford where he completed his doctorate in 1983. He has also been awarded honorary doctorates from Murdoch (2006) and the University of Western Australia (2012).

He was a Member of the Western Australian State Parliament from 1986 to 2006 during which he was a Minister in the Lawrence Government (1990 to 1993), Leader of the Labour Party (1996 to 2006) and State Premier from 2001 to 2006. From 2006 to 2015 he was Director of the Graduate School of Government and is now an Emeritus Professor of the University of Sydney.

Geoff has served on a range of Commonwealth Government bodies, most notably the Hospitals and Health Reform Commission, the COAG Reform Council and the Australia Awards Board (Chair). He also chaired the Australian Republican Movement (2012 – 2015), and is an active supporter of deliberative democracy as a means for tackling complex issues.

Neil McKeganey

Neil McKeganey is the founding director of the Centre for Drug Misuse Research at the University of Glasgow which he directed from 1994 to 2011. He now runs the Centre as an independent research group undertaking studies in a wide range of areas related to the use of illegal drugs drugs. – www.drugmisuseresearch.org – He has written over 150 academic articles and is the author of “Controversies in Drugs Policy and Practice” (Palgrave 2011). He is a sociologist by training and has undertaken research himself in such areas as the evaluation of drug treatment services, the nature and impact of drug policy, young people and illegal drugs, the impact of parental drug use on children, the link between drugs, crime and prosittution and the impact of drug enforcement activities.

Harry Shapiro

Harry Shapiro is the Director of DrugWise the international Knowledge hub, promoting evidence-based information on drugs, alcohol and tobacco. He has worked in the drugs field for over 35 years, most recently as Director of Communications for DrugScope. He was DrugScope’s main media spokesperson, managing editor of Druglink and has written extensively on all aspects of drugs and drug-related issues combining this with lecturing, public speaking and advisory work for government. He remains the managing editor of DS Daily.

Harry will deliver this year’s memorial lecture, the seventh in the series.

Ann Fordham

Ann Fordham directs the work of IDPC, leading on the coordination and development of the network. Ann was appointed as Executive Director in 2011. She joined IDPC in 2008 as the first coordinator of the network and in that time has grown the network from 32 to more than 140 organisations.

Ann leads on international advocacy efforts on drug policy and human rights, specifically calling for reform of laws and policies that have proven ineffective in reducing the scale of the drug market and have negatively impacted vulnerable population groups such as people who use drugs and growers of illicit crops. She represents IDPC at international events and works with policy makers and civil society partners around the world to review and shape drug control policies towards more humane, effective approaches that are based in principles of human rights and public health.

Ann is a member of the Strategic Advisory Group to UN on HIV and injecting drug use and is regularly invited to comment on global drug policy issues in the media. She has a Masters Degree in Human Rights from Sussex University where she specialised in human rights and harm reduction.

Susie McLean

Susie McLean leads the HIV and drug use programming at the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, an international partnership of civil society organisations in over 40 countries. In nine of these countries the Alliance is doing harm reduction programming, reaching approximately 250,000 drug users annually, making this one of the largest harm reduction programmes in the world.

Susie is the Chair of the Strategic Advisory Group to the UN on HIV and Drug Use and has a long standing interest in the practice of HIV and harm reduction programming in resource poor settings, and in advocacy to overcome barriers to harm reduction in settings as diverse as China and Kenya. Susie has worked as part of the community based response to HIV for over twenty-five years as a programmer, policy adviser and researcher.

Chris Ford

Dr Chris Ford recently retired from General Practice in London where she worked for 30 years. During this time she developed a special interest in working with people who use drugs and/or alcohol many with HIV and/or hepatitis. Increasingly concerned about the gap between practice and policy, Chris and others founded a UK network for supporting all health professionals working with people who have drug problems. In 2009 Chris set up International Doctors for Healthier Drug Policies (IDHDP) to be a bridge between practice and policy and to increase the international participation of medical doctors in drug policy and continues as Clinical Director.