City Health International

Founded in 2012 City Health International is a network of individuals and organisations engaged in the study of and response to structural health issues and health behaviours in the urban environment.


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22 March 2019, Liverpool, UK >> see more

David's blog #32

    Welcome to the Year of the Pig

I hope many of you had the opportunity to join in with events and celebrations to mark the new Chinese Lunar Year, that of the Pig. I have read that the associated attributes of the Year of the Pig include a beautiful personality, good fortune and special associations with the late evening and night time.

Read more....  Previous posts

World News

  • If sobriety isn’t an option, ‘harm reduction’ can work for homeless people with alcoholism, study finds

    A new University of Washington study finds a "harm reduction" approach can be effective at getting alcoholic and chronically homeless people to drink less. reg Hardegger was getting drunk on vanilla extract, living under the Dravus Street Bridge in Interbay, when one day in 2015 he decided to change his life. He went to Harborview Addiction Clinic and started a 12-step program. But it didn’t work for him. He kept going back to binge drinking [...]

    2019-03-15 | seattletimes.com

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  • Mental health problems can be diagnosed using children’s teeth, scientists suggest

    Children’s teeth could provide a window into their minds and help doctors diagnose mental health problems at an early stage, according to new research. Scientists examining teeth lost by six-year-olds found traces on their surface that were associated with behavioural problems. Children with thin tooth enamel in particular often found it hard to pay attention or were more aggressive, the study found. These traits that have been linked to poor [...]

    2019-02-22 | independent.co.uk

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  • Why the Rural Opioid Crisis Is Different From the Urban One

    In 2017, opioid overdose deaths in the U.S. reached a record high. And mayors and local leaders across the country have been scrambling to figure out what’s driving this precipitous rise of opioid mortality in the last two decades. Several theories have been aired, from aggressive Big Pharma marketing to anxiety among Baby Boomers. Unfortunately, no one-size-fits-all answer exist—how and why this public health problem manifests locally varies [...]

    2019-02-24 | citylab.com

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  • If You Build It, They Might Not Come: Animating City Spaces

    If you live in a city, you have probably walked by a newly redesigned public space that just happens to be…completely empty. In fact, millions of dollars are spent every year renovating public spaces in an effort to attract users. So, why do so many revamped areas remain unused and unloved after so much thought and economic resources are put into reenvisioning them? The Center for Active Design (CfAD) has spent the last four years exploring that [...]

    2019-02-21 | citylab.com

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  • How urban agriculture can improve food security in US citie

    During the partial federal shutdown in December 2018 and January 2019, news reports showed furloughed government workers standing in line for donated meals. These images were reminders that for an estimated one out of eight Americans, food insecurity is a near-term risk. In California, where I teach, 80 percent of the population lives in cities. Feeding the cities of the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, with a total population of some [...]

    2019-02-20 | theconversation.com

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  • Confused by the headlines on alcohol consumption? You should be

    Two front page headlines based on figures from the Office for National Statistics caused confusion this week. The Daily Mail, which is usually eager to push the Boozy Britain narrative, led with the news that the number of Britons who exceed the government’s drinking guidelines has fallen significantly. The Independent, by contrast, ran with the news that alcohol-related deaths have reached an all-time high. Who’s right? Actually, both of them [...

    2019-02-11 | health.spectator.co.uk

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